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in japan and beyond as a nation in i sis is forced to make very tough decisions. the battle for libya intensifying as rebels take a beating and government forces engage in nonstop shelling. will benghazi fall to moammar gadhafi. they are criticizing the president on not responding to issues at home and a broad. its all on "happening now." a good wednesday to you. i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we are here in the fox newsroom and happening right now as jon just mentioned brand-new developments in the nuclear crisis that is gripping japan and company company taourg all of our attention. emergency workers who have have now dubbed the fukushima 50 risking their lives to prevent further disaster. this after another fir fire has broken out at the nuke plant. radiation is 300 times normal. jon: the numbers today are staggering, millions across japan struggling with very little food and water. nearly half a million people there are homeless now, and some 3700 listed as dead, but that number sure will he will rise with ten thousand people still missing in one northeastern city alone. mar
in libya, across the middle east and japan. wolf in washington. two. happening right now, breaking news. president barack obama warns libyan troops and moammar gadhafi to stop attacks against civilians or face military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands o
by the moment in japan as more radiation is spewing in the atmosphere from the damaged nuclear plant. david piper in the air base west of tokyo. good morning, david. >> martha: the nuclear crisis is a dangerous level now. the fukushima nuclear complex has had a number of a explosion and they are saying it is moving to a dangerous level and the international nuclear agency said that fire started in a storage plant that spent nuclear fuel. japanese officials told them the fire was out now because they reportedly had help from the u.s. military. radiation leveled have sored around the complex. japanese authorities told people to seal doors and winnows and stay in home and avoid going out at all. japanese prime minister said radiation is released from the three reactors from the nuclear plant and a high risk of more radiation coming out. reactors are over heat raising the risk. japan has imposed a no fly zone over the plant. high levels of radiation in tokyo and now reportedly dropping. but just outside of tokyo there are above the normal level by 10 times. back to you in the studio. >> martha:
spread to other parts of japan. it does not appear that it poses any threat to either hawaii or territories or the rest of the united states. >>> andrea mitchell just sat down with secretary of state hillary clinton in cairo. what she says about the crisis in japan, the wave of revolutions in the middle east and her surprise stop today in tahrir square. >> it's very exciting and very moving. and to see where this revolution happened and all that it has meantรง to the world is extraordinary for me. >>> also this hour, our exclusive with senator kirsten gillibrand. what she's calling on the president to do in terms of ending the war in afghanistan. >>> good day, everybody, i'm nora o'donnell live in washington. andrea's completed interview is straight ahead. >>> we begin with japan. first the human toll. six days after the quake and tsunami, the official figures stand at 4,164 dead. 7,843 missing. the total now more than 12,000. at the fukushima nuclear plant, workers are desperately trying to cool the reactors. two reactors are believed to have been damaged. two more are at r
been talked -- touched by the magnitude until this disaster are closely following the events in japan and the repercussions in this country and in many other countries. before we begin, i would like to offer my sincere condolences to all of those who have been affected by the earthquake and the tsunami in japan. our hearts go out to all lead in dealing with the aftermath of these natural disasters. we are mindful of a long and difficult road they will face in recovering. we know the people of japan are resilience and strong and we have every confidence that they will come through this difficult time and move forward with resolved to rebuild their vibrant country. i believe i speak for all americans when i say that we stand together with the people of japan at this most difficult and challenging time. the nrc is a relatively small agency. we play a critical role in protecting american people and the environment when it comes to the use of nuclear materials. we have our inspectors to work full time as every nuclear plant in the country and we are proud to have world top scientists, engi
their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
. >> darya: in japan workers are trying to cool the plant where they were evacuated today after smoke rose from the damaged reactor. the cause of the smoke is unclear, the agency says the operator of the complex repeatedly had failed to be crucial inspections of equipment. in the weeks before that the plant was crippled by the earthquake in tsunami. workers have tried to spray the reactors with concrete. one of the several efforts to curb their release. instead of spreading water they are to bring concrete. it would only come into play if water does not cool the reactor spirit this is the latest we do we have. after week of blowing from the no west, when have now shifted threatening to blow radiation to more populated areas to the south. the pattern with the winds blowing from the north east through much of japan is expected to continue through tomorrow. that could carry material on shore from the facility, 150 mi. north of tokyo. >> reporter: monitoring some live pictures at of rockville md.. this is the commission meeting right now one of the things, that they came up with so far is that
questions about who is really responsible. i'm david wright in osaka, japan. >>> and now to an environmental scare closer to home. over the weekend a mile's long patch of sludge showed up in the gulf of mexico and washed up on the shores of louisiana's jefferson parish. the coast guard collected samples and officials say it does not appear to be from the bp oil spill. they say it is probably sediment washed into the gulf from the mississippi river. >>> the suspect in a grizzly murder at a yoga shop will be in court today. brittany norwood has been charged with first-degree murder. police say she killed her coworker and created an elaborate rouse to hide the crime. >> reporter: police say it was a fair of shoes that tipped them off. the crime scene had two sets of bloody footprints but one looked like it was faked. when police found norwood bound and gagged, they say the position she was tied up in was suspicious, with her hands tied above her head, she may have tied herself up. >> as we began analyzing the forensic evidence and looked at the medical reports, it was not supporting what the --
him. so now he is in something -- like crabs coming out of japan, being pulled down by everyone. what is right? what is wrong? president bush was too fast to go into war. they say he is too slow. he is going to take his time to see if he is right and do the right thing by people, not just black people, ever ready. this man loves everybody. you got white people that created this mess and that is coming down on him like he did it. something is wrong with this world. we see things going on and look at it in an abstract way. was notthis war started by president obama. we did not start having money shortage from president obama. he is the first black african american president. you white people sitting around a pole and give your opinion about things. -- around tables and give your opinions about things. you always have done best. this. guehost: our thanks to al- jazeera that is showing us what is going on in libya. from "the new york times", the allies open the air assault on gaddafi forces. residents interviewed. there was heavy fighting and the city center and pro-gaddafi snipers could
you would get on an intercontinental flight, going here from europe, say, or here from japan. i'm going to japan next week and i will get more radiation on my flight to japan next week than you will get from drinking any of this milk that they're seeing now. >> wow that is interesting. the epa stepping up monitoring. certainly want to watch these radiation levels. is there a way that we can know for sure, really, that it's safe? even though it's nice to than they're watching it, but -- >> well, the epa has got very good systems for looking at this, and we're getting ahead of the curve here. where we ran into problems at chernobyl where i was working years ago, was they didn't get monitoring fast enough. they didn't get ahead of the curve. we're way ahead of the curve on this. the epa has the ability to do this, we're going to be able to prevent anything from happening here in the united states and in the near term. >> i wanted to talk more with you about this. i know that a lot of people have questions about this and i do as well. only halfway through my list for you, cham. we'l
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. a lot of it is, i feel compelled to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a really race. -- relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence to rivera and you were fantastic. " -- who were there and who worked fantast
security council. and to add additional at-on sanctions from our partners, including the e.u., japan, and others. when you are trying to sanction iran, no matter how powerful you are and how much we can do, it is imperative that we get the international community to support it. otherwise, there is too much leakage. we have limited that, and i feel strongly that we are making an impact. >> thank you, and i request written responses that you offered to the questions that you are not able to answer because i have so many, including the deposition of the libyan officials, which is so timely. my good friend, the ranking member. >> i want to commend my colleagues on the committee the speech that secretary clinton gave in addition to her estimate -- excellent testimony, but yesterday, going to the human rights council, where she discussed libya, iran, and other issues come up quite a remarkable presentation, particularly in pointing out ypocrisy of ouriran's condemnations of libya. i would like asked -- try to get into issues in this short time. one, the israeli-palestinian process. the que
candidate. he talked about the pentagon budget and japan's nuclear power crisis. this was hosted by the ideal love republican party in davenport. it's 25 minutes. >> thank you very much. congratulations on this. it happened i got to speak at the first state party event at the chairman some of you may remember in july and in 2009 with the rising stars. the great event, read energy, great fun, and i told people at home he is going to be first-rate chairman. i picked up the three, and a former county chairmen. i was the county chairmen in my county twice, once for four years and once for six years and i'm going to just tell you this is where the elections were won. they were here where the rubber meets the road. >> judy, thank you for the work that you do. [applause] >> i would be here on march 15th, but i not going to have anybody to stand behind me. >> i'm really glad to be here for the kickoff the series speaker event because we are getting ready for something very important. the 2012 election is going to be a watershed election in american history. matt didn't go into all of my
friend and ally japan. i spoke with members of the foreign affairs and ministry of justice regarding the fact that japan has become a destination country, a haven for international child abductions. our foreign service officers and consul general were extremely sympathetic. at least 171 children and 131 broken hearted parents are worried sick and have no access to see their children. all of us want japan to sign the hague convention on international child deduction. that treaty will not solve the current cases. they stand at great risk of being left behind a second time. what is the administration's plan to resolve the current cases? on at least five occasions, president obama has met with them. did he raise the issue of those children and their left behind parents? since 1979, brothers and sisters have been illegal in china as part of the bar. one child per couple policy. for over 30 years, the you and public relations -- the u.n. population fund has supported and celebrated the mass of crimes against humanity. the facts are uncontested. any chinese or to that woman without -- or ti
point. you recently come back from a trip to japan. we're now here in washington talking as we tape this. you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas. what i am trying to understand is, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, that is done enough. -- a that is not enough. you have so many responsibilities that cut into a decision. it costs a lot to send you and a group of people overseas. why you do that? why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say that it was a science and theory. to go. it is not his that i covered the tsunami in indonesia or southeast asia, but i felt it was a story i had to experience tangibly. this incredible constellation of disasters -- at that moment, i felt there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision, where are your best their anchoring? the anchor of a relay race. when is the best for you to take the whole broadcasting go overseas? it does change that balance. in the middle east, there were a host of correspondence who were there and who were fan
afghanistan by the end of the year. follow the house live, here on c-span. >> earlier today, japan's prime minister called the damage from the earthquake the most severe challenge the nation has faced since world war ii. friday's disasters damage a series of nuclear reactors, particularly -- potentially sending one to a personal -- a partial meltdown. this statement is about 10 minutes. >> i would like to express my deepest sympathy to those who have been affected by the quake, and also in the disaster stricken areas, as well as to the people of japan who are in a very difficult situation. people remain very calm, and i would like to express my deepest gratitude as well as my respect to all those who are behaving very calmly. boeing yesterday, today we worked very hard to rescue people, and so far, the self- defense force as well as police and firefighters and maritime are able to save about 12,000 people. i would like to explain about the rescue efforts. the self-defense forces, all of the forces have mobilized 50,000 people, and they are to be doubled to 100,000, and the police officers,
to take resources away from that to help the effort to analyze what happened in japan the decisions on the new reactors are still some time away. right now they're getting public comment. that will take a few months to get all of those comments in. then we will begin the process of reviewing them. that is still several months away. i am not sure exactly how we will balance our resources. mother nature has thrown a hideous tons of the japanese, bigger than their civil a nuclear engineers and licensing authority's anticipated. how can we be confident -- not that we are likely to say tsunami -- how can we be confident that we won't have a hurricane, earthquake and other natural phenomenon that is bigger than the biggest thing you have budgeted for it? guest: the way we think about it is we come up with what we think is the maximum natural phenomenon that we expect to occur and we designed these facilities around that with a little bit extra margin because we now there are some things we don't know. we recognize there may things we had not envisioned or thought about. we have establishe
an argument. >> that's a good point, that's a good point. you have recently come back from a trip to japan. we are now here in washington talking as we tape this. but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas, and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer "because it was a great story," is not enough. why did you make the trip? you have so many responsibilities that come into a decision. why, for example, did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say is a science and a theory. it is not. a lot of it is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i cover that tsunami in indonesia and east asia, but i felt that that was the story that i had to experience tangibly, and to see. as we said, this incredible constellation of the disasters. i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there, and part of being an anchor, as you know, is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. is and it -- isn't it don hewitt who coined this term, "anchor"? a
major contributors. japan for example, provides the salaries for afghan police. there is another fund to which nato-isaf countries contribute, but again it is the afghan secret forces fund that is without question. >> does that 20-24% cut which i believe is in the c.r. and h.r.-1, how does that affect its? >> when that hits, and again, we project that that would hit perhaps sometime in june, that would have an enormous affect, a negative effect on our effort, needless to say. and it would undermine, it would undercut our efforts to develop the enablers. because again, we've always had a progression that first you develop the guys that can help you in the fight, actually out there against the insurgents. and gradually build institutions, the ministries, the branch schools, leader developer courses. by the way, literacy programs have featured very probably now. we finally bit the program -- bit the bullet. with basic training we also do basic literacy now and we're way over 100,000 that have been either train or in the process. >> can you provide a timeline then? getting the independenc
additional sanctions, the european union has additional sanctions, other countries like japan, korea, etc., have added on sanctions, to get some of our partners to follow sanctions that are not u.n. sanctions has been challenging. but we are at it every single day and we will keep it up. there will be more to report to you in the near future. >> thank you for that. i just hope that you can submit for the record how many are under review and what is the 180-day tolling period look like. >> thank you. >> good morning, madame. >> good morning. >> i want to talk with you about the national debt. in is a national issue an regards to national security. how does it affect our ability to affect events around the world? >> i think it is an incredibly important issue. i clearly agree that the united states must be strong at home in order to maintain our strength abroad. at the core of our strength is our economic strength. i am well aware, having sat for you and know sitting for eight years, the necessity to take action to begin to rein in our debt and, particularly, our indebtedness to foreign cou
attention from the historic changes in the middle east and north africa to the tragedy unfolding in japan. as i often say, we have to deal with both the urgent and the important at the same time. with president obama departing for resilience in just a few hours, -- for brazilia and just a few hours, this is the time to consider another important part of the world. the president's trip coincides with the anniversary of a major milestone in hemispheric relations. 50 years ago, president kennedy launched the alliance for progress, pledging that the united states would join with latin american leaders to address head-on a development challenge that was, as he put it, staggering in its dimensions. he understood that our failure to tackle poverty and inequality in latin america could tear the social fabric and undercut democracy's prospects throughout the hemisphere. president kennedy announced the alliance here in washington to an audience of latin american ambassadors at the white house. president obama will mark this anniversary in latin america. i think that is fitting. too few americans ha
sympathy for the people of japan due to the massive earthquake and tsunami. but i was grateful to learn last week at the rotary club that the rotary foundation is taking direct action. special assistant bill walker of the second district office is a dedicated rotarian. the rotary japan and disaster fund has been established for donations online worldwide. the international president of missouri is promoting the people assistance in the best tradition with his creed, building communities, bridging continents. japan is a leading rotary nation and it is fitting the incoming r.i. president nominee to continue the relief assistance of the club of japan. as a rotarian, i appreciate the role worldwide with hundreds of new clubs in formerly communist countries who are making a difference with service above self. as with polio plus, rotarians can achieve humanitarian assistance which creates worldwide records for effectiveness. in conclusion, god bless our troops, we will never forget september 11 and the global war on terrorism. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the cha
of that decade. one thinks of japan where there was no return of growth until the beginning of this decade. how could you possibly attribute to the government as you do? >> i'm grateful for the honorable gentleman's point we have argued consistently and so has the international community that we had a financial crisis from 2008 and 2009. and out of that crisis without making references to tsunamis and earthquakes there are many after-shocks and it takes much time to actually get over that. so i certainly agree with that point. but it was not us who said that we were going to raise growth in last year. it was the conservative government. and the honorable member from chichester when he pointed out that under a labour government we had 40% debt in relation to gross domestic product. my recollection in some years it was 37%. it was the financial crisis that pushed it up to where it was. >> i'm very grateful from my honorable friend giving way. would he also say that's particularly startling after all the motions we've heard from the chancellor and the budget, the growth forecast is actually after
and japan's statistics, they are lower than ours. if any, these are optimistic figures. >> that is exactly right. japan as you probably all know has a birthrate not of 2.0, but more like 1.25. their population, i think, is about in 2005 has been declining even though people are living so much longer. their population is declining and they have essentially no net immigration, so we are still having at least essentially replacement birthrates and having net immigration so good point. our problem is significant, but it's actually worse eel where, so -- elsewhere, so if that's solace, that's real good news. again, if you look at the birthrate at 2.0, add in the net immigration, it makes the equivalent of 2.3. that means while the birthrate dropped from about 3 down to 2 with the help of immigration it's 2.3. it's not quite as bad as just looking at birth rates, but it's still very, very significant. now, the imp nations of all of this -- implications on all of this in social security and beyond social security currently, we can look at what has happened to the relationship between the number o
, russia, west europe, and japan and turkey. they preface pages xv to 17 spells out the inputs that the task force had. sometimes brilliant background papers in the end of the report, and particularly one just published on women in afghanistan on the perspective of somebody who was under cover trying to maintain women's schools during taliban rule in their country. with background meetings in a dozen capitols, including a meeting with afghan on all sides from senior officials to the kabul government to the political opposition within that political system to civil society to, yes, persons intimately linked to the insurgency. and we at century, my colleague michael hannah and we provided the kind of support that handwriting what was being told to us by the wisdom of those task force members. they set the course and it's to them that we now turn to outline to you our groups recommendations and findings. so tom? >> thank you very much, jeff, for your very kind introduction and for your setting the stage. i begin by saying the reports findings with the wildly varying were unanimous
problems, even to the point of crisis in the next few years. many people have said japan is locked in crisis, that crisis is coming because of the debt that they've accumulated. when that comes to america, do we want to have government by crisis? already we can't even pass a budget. we can't pass appropriations bills. our bills do not even go to the committees anymore. they just come to the floor and we put a patchwork quilt on them and there's a chance this ends up being two more weeks. it is not the way you should run government. if you want to have a significant plan for changing things, send things through the committee. if up to the have a realistic way of running government, have appropriations bills. if you want to be someone who believes in good, responsible government, for goodness sakes, pass a budget. we didn't pass a budget last year. this chart shows how big the problem is. i wish i had a magnifying glass because that's the only way you could see the other side's proposal. $6 billion in cuts. it's one day's borrowing. it's not even one day's spending that they're talki
force trust fund and there are other mechanisms, as well. japan, as an example funds the salaries of the national police, a very significant contribution. so continuing that and increasing that is hugely important. the very high levels of afghan national security force funding right now are, of course, necessary because we're building them. and it requires the infrastructure equipment, in some cases various contract trainers and other contract assistance. these are the big cost drivers, actually, not salaries per se. so once the infrastructure is built and then it is in the sustainment mode rather than the construction mode, costs will come down. obviously as equipment has procured. the element of that cost will come down. as afghan trainers take over for contract trains, that cost will come down. it will still be considerable. and secretary gates talked about that. and certainly over time, afghanistan itself as it is able, again, to exploit its extraordinary mineral blessings, the trillions with an "s" on the end of it of dollars. as they are able to extract and get those to mark
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28